“My Solo Trip to Charleston, South Carolina”

Check out Allison Anderson’s video on traveling solo to Charleston. It is a delightful video and has great videography. You’ll also enjoy her related blog post –

“With its colorful houses, beautiful beaches and southern charm, I’ve heard people rave about Charleston, South Carolina for years. And because spring in Seattle is not so charming thanks to relentless rain, I decided to fly south and embark on a road trip through one of the most beautiful regions in the country, with a 4-day stop in Charleston on the route.”

https://allisonanderson.com/blog/traveling-solo-charleston

In the video and in the blog post Allison shares where she stayed and the ‘best things she did’.

Also, check out her Instagram account @photoallison https://www.instagram.com/photoallison/

Top 10 Tips for Visiting Charleston from Nat’l Geographic Travel

“Discover the Best of Charleston” National Geographic TRAVEL

On May 11th, 2018 National Geographic TRAVEL posted “Discover the Best of Charleston: Make the most of your trip with these top ten tips for the “Holy City.” Nancy Gupton wrote:

One of the United States’ oldest cities, Charleston—nicknamed the Holy City for its abundance of churches—offers visitors plenty to experience and explore. Don’t be overwhelmed: These are our top ten tips for making the most of your time…”

Examples:

1 – SEE THE BIRDS

2- WANDER THE GARDENS

Read the article for the other eight hints and to read her elaboration on each.

Very useful!

Charleston named ‘South’s Best City’ AGAIN

Charleston, S.C.'s pineapple fountain - Wikimedia Commons
Charleston, S.C.’s pineapple fountain – Wikipedia

Southern Living magazine once again named Charleston as the Best City in the south.  The announcement was made in the April 2018 magazine.

Some suggestions for traveling to Charleston from the Southern Living announcement:

The Parking & Traffic Struggles of the Lowcountry

Traffic backup in Charleston, S.C. (source: LowCountrySource.com)
Traffic backup in Charleston, S.C. (source: LowCountrySource.com)

The Post and Courier posted an article entitled, “Grand Strand, Lowcountry wrestle with beach visitor parking” written by Prentiss Findlay.

Here are some excerpts…

“From the booming Grand Strand to the bustling Lowcountry, the roadside turf for beach day-trippers is shrinking as cities impose new rules in response to resident complaints about traffic congestion, rowdy crowds and unsafe streets.”

This was said of Myrtle Beach, but surely applies to the Low Country as well: “Parking problems that used to happen only on holidays such as Easter or the Fourth of July have become an issue every weekend…”

“On peak days, Charleston County’s main beaches — Sullivan’s, Folly Beach and Isle of Palms — may suddenly swell from a few thousand residents to more than 10,000 visitors. Traffic can back up for miles…”

Click here to read the entire article.

 

Weather is right for Charleston Water Taxi!

Beginning in Mid March the Charleston Water Taxi’s schedule expanded to daily from 9 am to 8 pm. Prior to that they were mostly open on Saturdays.

There are four departure points with different departing times.  The four points are:

  • Aquarium Wharf/MaritimeCenter
  • Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum
  • Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina
  • Waterfront Park/Market St/Historic District

Visit their Website  |   Visit their Facebook page

Click here to see their excellent TripAdvisor reviews.

Colonial Lake – Downtown Charleston, S.C.

Playground, walking paths, picnic tables, athletic fields, tennis courts.

Dogs are allowed.

Colonial Lake - Downtown Charleston, S.C.

 

Intersection of Ashley Avenue and Broad Street
Charleston, S.C.
 
Picture and text below source – http://bit.ly/tkQSvT
 
The lake and its park were part of the Commons established by an Act of the Commons House of Assembly in 1768, setting aside the area forever for public use.
The tradition that the lake was developed as a small boat harbor for planters apparently has no foundation in fact.

Most likely, it served as mill pond for a succession of sawmills which operated in the vicinity.

For many years the lake was known as the Rutledge Street Pond.

It acquired the name, Colonial Lake, in 1881, in honor of the “Colonial Commons” established in 1768. Some residents still call it “The Pond.”

The park around the lake was developed in 1882-87.

Fountains were placed in the lake in 1973, not for decorative purposes, but to aerate the water and prevent fish kills on hot summer days.

Gala Week used to be held in the fall of the year, with a fireworks display on the west side of the Pond, which was then an undeveloped area.

Spectators filled to park and crowded onto boats in the lake.’

Get Directions