Give the gift of Museums for Christmas!

Charleston's Museum Mile - CharlestonMuseumMile.org
Charleston’s Museum Mile – CharlestonMuseumMile.org

“During the month of January 2018, enjoy access to participating Museum Mile sites with the purchase of one low ticket price! With the Museum Mile Month pass, you can spend an entire month learning about Charleston’s rich history and culture while visiting sites in the order that best fits your schedule.

Participating sites include:

Tickets ordered in advance can be mailed to your door or you may request to have them held for pick up at The Charleston Museum, the Heyward-Washington House or the Joseph Manigault House.

PLEASE NOTE: Purchases can be made in advance online until 12/31/2017. During January 2018, ticket purchases must be made in person at a Charleston Visitor Center downtown, in North Charleston or in Mount Pleasant. “

Source:  CharlestonMuseum.org

The Exchange and Provost – a Landmark

A  National Historic Landmark

The Exchange and Provost - a Landmark

Picture Source – National Park Service

122 East Bay Street,
Charleston, SC 29401
843-722-2165 
oldexchange.org/

‘The Exchange and Provost, a National Historic Landmark, was a pivotal building in colonial Charleston, where many significant events of the American Revolution and early Federal period occurred.

As Charleston became the South’s largest port, the Exchange and Custom House was built from 1767 to 1771 for the expanding shipping industry, but also served as a public market and meeting place.

After a protest meeting against the Tea Act, confiscated tea was stored here in 1774.

The Provincial Congress of South Carolina met here the following year.

During the Revolutionary War, the British used the building for barracks and the basement as a military prison.

The State Legislature met here in 1788, after the Statehousewas destroyed.

When George Washington visited Charleston on his southern tour of 1791, a grand ball was held for him on the second floor.’

Source – National Park Service 

To learn more about the architectural style of the builiding, how it originally fronted the harbor, its original purpose, damage to the building due to the Civil War and the 1886 earthquake AND the builiding’s relationship to the DAR see the National Park Service Website OR Wikipedia.

Nathaniel Russell House – Charleston, S.C.

A National Historic Landmark

Nathaniel Russell House - Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – Wikipedia

51 Meeting Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-724-8481
bit.ly/8I2d1U

‘Since 1808, visitors have admired the grand Federal townhouse of Charleston merchant Nathaniel Russell.

Set amid spacious formal gardens, the Nathaniel Russell House is a National Historic Landmark and is widely recognized as one of America’s most important neoclassical dwellings.

The graceful interior with elaborate plasterwork ornamentation, geometrically shaped rooms and a magnificent free-flying staircase are among the most exuberant ever created in early America.

Located in Downtown Charleston near High Battery, the house is furnished with period antiques and works of art that evoke the gracious lifestyle of the city’s merchant elite.

Today the Nathaniel Russell House interprets the lives of the Russell family, as well as the African American slaves and artisans who were responsible for maintaining one of the South’s grandest antebellum townhouses.’

Source – HistoricCharleston.org Nathaniel Russell House Website.

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens – Charleston, S.C.

Listed on theNational Register of Historic Places.

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens - Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – Wikipedia

3550 Ashley River Road,
Charleston, SC – 29414
800-367-3517

www.magnoliaplantation.com/

‘Magnolia Plantation and Gardens (70 acres, 28 hectares) is a historic house with gardens located on the Ashley River at 3550 Ashley River Road, Charleston CountySouth CarolinaUnited States.

It is one of the oldest plantations in the south, and listed on theNational Register of Historic Places.

‘A variety of tours are offered including the slave quarters and the family home. Tram tours are led by naturalists and visitors often see alligators, turtles, snakes, peacocks and waterfowl. The gardens are one of the oldest INFORMAL gardens in the U.S. with cooperation with nature rather than control of nature’.Adapted from article about Charleston by Judith Evans.

The house and gardens are open daily; an admission fee is charged.

Magnolia Plantation is located near Charleston and directly across the Ashley River from North Charleston.

The plantation dates to 1676 when Thomas and Ann Drayton built a house and small formal garden on the site.

(The plantation remains under the control of the Drayton family after 15 generations.).’

Source – Wikipedia

There is a lovely blog post related to Magnolia Plantation, magnolias and camellias entitled, Magnificent Magnolia Plantation: By Gene Phillips.

St. Philips Episcopal Church – a Landmark

Listed in National Register of Historic Places.

St. Philips Episcopal Church - a Landmark

Picture Source – http://1.usa.gov/nELP61

146 Church Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-722-7734
www.stphilipschurchsc.org/

St. Philips ‘houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina and was the first Anglican church established south of Virginia.

This church is the third building to house the congregation, which was formed by Charles Town colonists.

The first church, built in 1681, was a small wooden building located at the present site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church.

In the early 18th century, the congregation built a second brick church at the site of the current church.

It’s construction was partially funded by duties on rum and slaves.

After suffering from one fire that was extinguished by a black slave, who was given his freedom for this act, the church completely burned in 1835.

The current St. Philip’s was constructed from 1835 to 1838 by architect Joseph Hyde, while the steeple, designed by E.B. White, was added a decade later.’

Source – National Park Service 

For more information on the church extending into the street and prominent people buried in the graveyard visit the National Park Service Website above.

St. Marys Roman Catholic Church – a Landmark

Listed in National Register of Historic Places.

St. Marys Roman Catholic Church - a Landmark

Source – National Park Service

The First Catholic Church in the Carolinas and Georgia
Established August 24, 1789

Located at 89 Hasell Street, Charleston, S.C.
Adjacent to Charleston Place Hotel
Telephone Number 843-722-7696
Fax Line 843-577-5036
stmarys1789@bellsouth.net

 
www.catholic-doc.org/saintmarys/ 

Sunday Mass
9:30 am

Daily Mass
Monday – Friday 7:00am

Rosary:
Tuesdays 5:30 am

‘The congregation of St. Mary’s was the first Roman Catholic Church in the Carolinas and Georgia.

A sufficient number of Catholic immigrants had arrived in Charleston by the late 18th century, that Reverend Ryan, an Irish priest, was sent to the city in 1788.

The Hasell Street site was purchased for the church by trustees one year later, and the congregation has worshiped here ever since.

The congregation first worshiped in a dilapidated Methodist meeting house that was at the site.

In 1801 the congregation constructed their own brick church. The Charleston fire of 1838 that burned much of the surrounding Ansonborough neighborhood also destroyed most of the Catholic church.

The present building was completed in 1839 in the Classical Revival style.

Its monumental form, elements and ornamental details are adapted from classic Roman architecture with typical Classical details such as its arched openings and Tuscan portico with a parapet.’

Source – National Park Service

To learn more about tombstones in the churchyard, the pews, paintings, etc. visit the National Park Service Website orWikipedia.

‘It is open to the public Monday-Friday, 9:30am to 3:30pm. Call 843-722-7696 for further information.’

Preservation Society of Charleston – Charleston, S.C.

Preservation Society of Charleston - Charleston, S.C.

147 King Street

Charleston, SC
29403

843-722-4630

www.preservationsociety.org/

“Founded in 1920, the Preservation Society of Charleston is the oldest community based historic preservation organization in America. Our mission is to inspire the involvement of all who dwell in the Lowcountry to honor and respect our material and cultural heritage.”

Featuring:

  • Preservation Programs
  • Perservation Education
  • Fall Tours
  • Events
  • and more.

Old Slave MarOld Slave Mart Museum – Charleston, S.C.

Old Slave Mart Museum - Charleston, S.C.

Picture and Text Below Source – http://1.usa.gov/bYIbTy

6 Chalmers Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401

843-958-6467

‘The Old Slave Mart, located on one of Charleston’s few remaining cobblestone streets, is the only known extant building used as a slave auction gallery in South Carolina. Once part of a complex of buildings, the Slave Mart building is the only structure to remain.

When it was first constructed in 1859, the open ended building was referred to as a shed, and used the walls of the German Fire Hall to its west to support the roof timbers.

Slave auctions were held inside.

The interior was one large room with a 20-foot ceiling, while the front facade was more impressive with its high arch, octagonal pillars and a large iron gate.

During the antebellum period, Charleston served as a center of commercial activity for the South’s plantation economy, which depended heavily upon slaves as a source of labor. Customarily in Charleston, slaves were sold on the north side of theExchange Building (then the Custom House)…

Around 1878, the Slave Mart was renovated into a two-story tenement dwelling. In 1938, the property was purchased by Miriam B. Wilson, who turned the site into a museum of African American history, arts and crafts.’

It is owned by the City of Charleston.

Hours – Monday-Saturday, 9:00am to 5:00pm.

Call 843-958-6467 for information.

Admission fees are charged.

1.usa.gov/bYIbTy

Old City Market Hall and Sheds – Historic Charleston, S.C.

Old City Market Hall and Sheds - Historic Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – National Park Service

Corner of Market St. and Meeting St.,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-853-8000
www.thecharlestoncitymarket.com

‘Steeped in history and charm, the Charleston City Market is a popular destination for all who visit the Holy City.

Open 365 days per year, the Market is an exciting place for tourists and local Charleston residents alike.

Market Hall stands facing Meeting Street as the main entrance to four blocks of open-air buildings.

Strolling through the Market you will encounter a wide assortment of vendors selling high quality products including paintings, pottery, Charleston’s famous sweetgrass baskets, casual and fine dining & more!’

PDF Map of Historic Charleston Market

Visitor Info

Source – http://bit.ly/9Eunay

 

Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and sometimes later on weekend evenings.

 

Vendor contact information and more can be found on the City of Charleston Website
Source of text below – National Park Service

 

History of the Market –

‘The Market Hall and Sheds, a National Historic Landmark, are the only surviving market buildings in Charleston, and one of a small number of market complexes still extant in the United States.

The Market is also considered to be one of Charlestons best examples of Greek Revival style architecture, exemplified by its massive portico supported by Tuscan columns.

The buildings were constructed in 1840 to 41 and were designed by prominent local architect Edward Brickell White.

The Market was the commercial hub of Charleston for many years and is an important part of the city’s commercial heritage.’

 

Source – National Park Service

 

For more about the history of the market and the current occupancy visit the National Park Service Website ORWikipedia.

The Confederate Museum – Charleston, S.C.

Confederate Museum, Charleston, S.C.
Photo source – http://www.csa-scla.org/articles/ConfederateMuseum.htm
 
188 Meeting Street
Charleston,
SC – 29401
843-723-1541
 
The Confederate Museum is located above the open-air market a National Historic Landmark

Hours of Operation: Tuesday – Saturday 11AM – 3:30PM,  Closed on Sundays and Mondays/ Call to verify hours and days. 

Admission: Adults & Teens $5.00—-6 – 12 years old $3.00, Under 6 Free

Built in 1841.

Contains the Daughters of the Confederacy Museum.

During the Civil War the hall was a recruiting station.

Features Greek Revival-style architecture.

The museum has a library, exhibits and artifacts of the confederacy.

Donations Always Welcomed ~
Mail to: Confederate Museum
P.O. Box 20997
Charleston, SC 29413

Find out more…http://www.csa-scla.org/articles/ConfederateMuseum.htm