Good news! Bitty & Beau’s Coffee is coming to Charleston!!


“It is more than just a place to grab a cup of coffee – it’s an experience. While the shop is run by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the customers love the products, they really come in for the unique customer service experience.”
https://www.bittyandbeauscoffee.com/


Media Coverage – WRAL (Raleigh) – “Wilmington coffee shop known for celebrating people with disabilities expands to Charleston”

The Exchange and Provost – a Landmark

A  National Historic Landmark

The Exchange and Provost - a Landmark

Picture Source – National Park Service

122 East Bay Street,
Charleston, SC 29401
843-722-2165 
oldexchange.org/

‘The Exchange and Provost, a National Historic Landmark, was a pivotal building in colonial Charleston, where many significant events of the American Revolution and early Federal period occurred.

As Charleston became the South’s largest port, the Exchange and Custom House was built from 1767 to 1771 for the expanding shipping industry, but also served as a public market and meeting place.

After a protest meeting against the Tea Act, confiscated tea was stored here in 1774.

The Provincial Congress of South Carolina met here the following year.

During the Revolutionary War, the British used the building for barracks and the basement as a military prison.

The State Legislature met here in 1788, after the Statehousewas destroyed.

When George Washington visited Charleston on his southern tour of 1791, a grand ball was held for him on the second floor.’

Source – National Park Service 

To learn more about the architectural style of the builiding, how it originally fronted the harbor, its original purpose, damage to the building due to the Civil War and the 1886 earthquake AND the builiding’s relationship to the DAR see the National Park Service Website OR Wikipedia.

Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center

Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center

Photo and text source – http://bit.ly/33Llua

5200 Savannah Highway, 
Ravenel, SC 29470
 
Contact

(843) 889-8898 or

(843) 795-4386

Email

Hours

Wed-Sun: 9:00am-5:00pm

Mon and Tue: Closed

Admission

$1 or 1 Greenbax per person

Free: 2 years and under

Free: Gold Pass members

‘Journey from the past to the present and heritage to habitat at the Ravenel Caw Caw Interpretive Center. Rich in natural, cultural and historical resources, Caw Caw was once part of several rice plantations and home to enslaved Africans who applied their technology and skills in agriculture to carve the series of rice fields out of cypress swamps.

To help preserve and protect our natural resources and interpretive trails, dogs and bicycles are not permitted.’

Features

– Over 6 miles of trails with trailside exhibits

– Elevated boardwalks through wetlands (1,435 ft.)

– Environmental and social studies education programs from pre-school through college level

– Interpretive exhibits, displays, and programs

– Former 18th and 19th century rice fields and on one of the most important sites of the Stono Rebellion

– Thousands of naturalized tea plants from a 20th century tea farm

– Areas managed for wildlife including waterfowl, songbirds, otters, deer, and more

– Favored habitats for rare wildlife: American Alligators, Swallow-tailed Kites, Bald Eagles, and others

Group Rates

Environmental Educator or Interpreter-led educational group rates are available with reservations Monday through Sunday or self-led educational group rates available with reservations Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, call (843) 889-8898.

Edisto Beach State Park – Charleston County S.C.

Edisto Beach State Park - Charleston County S.C.

Picture Source – SouthCarolinaParks.com

8377 State Cabin Road,
Edisto Island, SC 29438

The southern end of Edisto Island is in Colleton County while Edisto Beach is in Charleston County.

‘An oceanfront campground on a palmetto-lined beach famed for its shelling is just one highlight of Edisto Beach State Park.

Only an hour from Charleston, the park also offers another campground deep in the maritime forest full of live oaks and some of the states tallest palmetto trees, as well as a row of comfortable cabins nestled in the woods but with a front-row view of miles of pristine marshland.

Edisto Beach State Park also offers the states longest system of handicapped-friendly hiking and biking trails, including one leading to a mysterious, 4,000-year-old shell midden alongside a secluded bend on a tidal creek.

The park also has an environmental education center, a green building full of exhibits that highlight the natural history of Edisto Island and the surrounding ACE Basin, one of the nations largest preserved estuaries.’

Source – SouthCarolinaParks.com

Colonial Lake – Downtown Charleston, S.C.

Playground, walking paths, picnic tables, athletic fields, tennis courts.

Dogs are allowed.

Colonial Lake - Downtown Charleston, S.C.

 

Intersection of Ashley Avenue and Broad Street
Charleston, S.C.
 
Picture and text below source – http://bit.ly/tkQSvT
 
The lake and its park were part of the Commons established by an Act of the Commons House of Assembly in 1768, setting aside the area forever for public use.
The tradition that the lake was developed as a small boat harbor for planters apparently has no foundation in fact.

Most likely, it served as mill pond for a succession of sawmills which operated in the vicinity.

For many years the lake was known as the Rutledge Street Pond.

It acquired the name, Colonial Lake, in 1881, in honor of the “Colonial Commons” established in 1768. Some residents still call it “The Pond.”

The park around the lake was developed in 1882-87.

Fountains were placed in the lake in 1973, not for decorative purposes, but to aerate the water and prevent fish kills on hot summer days.

Gala Week used to be held in the fall of the year, with a fireworks display on the west side of the Pond, which was then an undeveloped area.

Spectators filled to park and crowded onto boats in the lake.’

Morris Island and Morris Island Light

Morris Island Lighthouse, Charleston, S.C,

Picture and Text Source – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island

Morris Island is an 840 acre (3.4 km²) uninhabited island in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, accessible only by boat. The island lies in the outer reaches of the harbor and was thus a strategic location in the American Civil War.

Morris Island was heavily fortified to defend Charleston harbor…It was the scene of heavy fighting during the Union Army‘s campaign to captureCharleston, and is perhaps best known today as the scene of the ill-fated assault by the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, an African-American regiment. The regiment and this assault, where it suffered over 50% casualties, was immortalized in the film Glory.”

After the Confederates abandoned Morris Island in 1863, the Union occupied it and transferred 520 Confederate officers from Fort Delaware to Morris Island… They were used as Human Shields…”   Be sure to read on! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island and the article on the Morris Island Light 

Morris Island Light - Wikipedia

Picture Source – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island_Light

 

Old Jail – Charleston, S.C.

Old Jail - Charleston, S.C.

Picture and Text below source – http://1.usa.gov/r0A2rr

21 Magazine Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-577-5245

‘Now occupied by the American College of the Building Arts.’

‘Tours are available by appointment.’

‘The Old Jail building served as the Charleston County Jail from its construction in 1802 until 1939. In 1680, as the city of Charleston was being laid out, a four-acre square of land was set aside at this location for public use. In time a hospital, poor house, workhouse for runaway slaves, and this jail were built on the square…Increased restrictions were placed on slaves and free blacks in Charleston as a result of the Vesey plot (explained on the Website), and law required that all black seaman be kept here while they were in port. During the Civil War, Confederate and Federal prisoners of war were incarcerated here. It is one of more than 1400 historically significant buildings within the Charleston Old and Historic District.’

 

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens – Charleston, S.C.

Listed on theNational Register of Historic Places.

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens - Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – Wikipedia

3550 Ashley River Road,
Charleston, SC – 29414
800-367-3517

www.magnoliaplantation.com/

‘Magnolia Plantation and Gardens (70 acres, 28 hectares) is a historic house with gardens located on the Ashley River at 3550 Ashley River Road, Charleston CountySouth CarolinaUnited States.

It is one of the oldest plantations in the south, and listed on theNational Register of Historic Places.

‘A variety of tours are offered including the slave quarters and the family home. Tram tours are led by naturalists and visitors often see alligators, turtles, snakes, peacocks and waterfowl. The gardens are one of the oldest INFORMAL gardens in the U.S. with cooperation with nature rather than control of nature’.Adapted from article about Charleston by Judith Evans.

The house and gardens are open daily; an admission fee is charged.

Magnolia Plantation is located near Charleston and directly across the Ashley River from North Charleston.

The plantation dates to 1676 when Thomas and Ann Drayton built a house and small formal garden on the site.

(The plantation remains under the control of the Drayton family after 15 generations.).’

Source – Wikipedia

There is a lovely blog post related to Magnolia Plantation, magnolias and camellias entitled, Magnificent Magnolia Plantation: By Gene Phillips.

St. Philips Episcopal Church – a Landmark

Listed in National Register of Historic Places.

St. Philips Episcopal Church - a Landmark

Picture Source – http://1.usa.gov/nELP61

146 Church Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-722-7734
www.stphilipschurchsc.org/

St. Philips ‘houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina and was the first Anglican church established south of Virginia.

This church is the third building to house the congregation, which was formed by Charles Town colonists.

The first church, built in 1681, was a small wooden building located at the present site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church.

In the early 18th century, the congregation built a second brick church at the site of the current church.

It’s construction was partially funded by duties on rum and slaves.

After suffering from one fire that was extinguished by a black slave, who was given his freedom for this act, the church completely burned in 1835.

The current St. Philip’s was constructed from 1835 to 1838 by architect Joseph Hyde, while the steeple, designed by E.B. White, was added a decade later.’

Source – National Park Service 

For more information on the church extending into the street and prominent people buried in the graveyard visit the National Park Service Website above.

St. Marys Roman Catholic Church – a Landmark

Listed in National Register of Historic Places.

St. Marys Roman Catholic Church - a Landmark

Source – National Park Service

The First Catholic Church in the Carolinas and Georgia
Established August 24, 1789

Located at 89 Hasell Street, Charleston, S.C.
Adjacent to Charleston Place Hotel
Telephone Number 843-722-7696
Fax Line 843-577-5036
stmarys1789@bellsouth.net

 
www.catholic-doc.org/saintmarys/ 

Sunday Mass
9:30 am

Daily Mass
Monday – Friday 7:00am

Rosary:
Tuesdays 5:30 am

‘The congregation of St. Mary’s was the first Roman Catholic Church in the Carolinas and Georgia.

A sufficient number of Catholic immigrants had arrived in Charleston by the late 18th century, that Reverend Ryan, an Irish priest, was sent to the city in 1788.

The Hasell Street site was purchased for the church by trustees one year later, and the congregation has worshiped here ever since.

The congregation first worshiped in a dilapidated Methodist meeting house that was at the site.

In 1801 the congregation constructed their own brick church. The Charleston fire of 1838 that burned much of the surrounding Ansonborough neighborhood also destroyed most of the Catholic church.

The present building was completed in 1839 in the Classical Revival style.

Its monumental form, elements and ornamental details are adapted from classic Roman architecture with typical Classical details such as its arched openings and Tuscan portico with a parapet.’

Source – National Park Service

To learn more about tombstones in the churchyard, the pews, paintings, etc. visit the National Park Service Website orWikipedia.

‘It is open to the public Monday-Friday, 9:30am to 3:30pm. Call 843-722-7696 for further information.’