Morris Island and Morris Island Light

Morris Island Lighthouse, Charleston, S.C,

Picture and Text Source – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island

Morris Island is an 840 acre (3.4 km²) uninhabited island in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, accessible only by boat. The island lies in the outer reaches of the harbor and was thus a strategic location in the American Civil War.

Morris Island was heavily fortified to defend Charleston harbor…It was the scene of heavy fighting during the Union Army‘s campaign to captureCharleston, and is perhaps best known today as the scene of the ill-fated assault by the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, an African-American regiment. The regiment and this assault, where it suffered over 50% casualties, was immortalized in the film Glory.”

After the Confederates abandoned Morris Island in 1863, the Union occupied it and transferred 520 Confederate officers from Fort Delaware to Morris Island… They were used as Human Shields…”   Be sure to read on! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island and the article on the Morris Island Light 

Morris Island Light - Wikipedia

Picture Source – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Island_Light

 

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Fort Sumter – Charleston, S.C.

Fort Sumter is a federal fort in Charleston Harbor with a museum that tells the story of the fort’s role in the Civil War.

Ft. Sumter

‘Where The American Civil War Began

Decades of growing strife between North and South erupted in civil war on April 12, 1861, when Confederate artillery opened fire on this Federal fort in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter surrendered 34 hours later. Union forces would try for nearly four years to take it back.’

Source – Fort Sumter National Monument – U.S. Natonal Park Service Website

Fort Sumter - Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – U.S. Natonal Park Service Website

The fort is constructed of over 70,000 tons and granite and rock.

There are three sites within the Fort Sumter National Monument – Charleston: the original Fort Sumter, Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center and Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island.

To visit Fort Sumter by RV or bus, we recommend taking the 30 minute ferry from the visitor center or Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum. ‘Their parking area can easily accommodate large vehicles. Parking for large vehicles in downtown Charleston is extremely limited, and the public parking garage has a clearance of 7’.

To visit Fort Moultrie by RV or bus, the parking area at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center can accommodate your vehicle.’

‘You cannot get to Fort Sumter from Sullivan’s Island and Fort Moultrie.

Sullivans Island is the mailing address of the park and the location of Fort Moultrie and Park Headquarters.

Fort Sumter is located on an island in Charleston harbor and is only accessible by boat.

If you do not have access to a private boat, a concession-operated ferry is available.

The primary departure site is from the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center located in downtown Charleston.

For departure schedules and fees, visit the concessioner page.

(SpiritLine Cruises is the concessioner – Their address is 360 Concord Street, Suite 201. – See Fort Sumter Tours – SpiritLine Cruises on CharlestonShines.com for more info)

The secondary departure site is located at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant. Visitors with large vehicles such as buses and RVs should plan on using the Patriots Point departure site.

Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center
340 Concord Street
Charleston, South Carolina
843-722-2628

www.nps.gov/fosu/index.htm

Source – U.S. Natonal Park Service Website

Fort Sumter Tours

Picture Source – U.S. Natonal Park Service Website

Fort Sumter Area Map

Fort Sumpter Area Map

Picture Source – U.S. Natonal Park Service Website

The Confederate Museum – Charleston, S.C.

Confederate Museum, Charleston, S.C.
Photo source – http://www.csa-scla.org/articles/ConfederateMuseum.htm
 
188 Meeting Street
Charleston,
SC – 29401
843-723-1541
 
The Confederate Museum is located above the open-air market a National Historic Landmark

Hours of Operation: Tuesday – Saturday 11AM – 3:30PM,  Closed on Sundays and Mondays/ Call to verify hours and days. 

Admission: Adults & Teens $5.00—-6 – 12 years old $3.00, Under 6 Free

Built in 1841.

Contains the Daughters of the Confederacy Museum.

During the Civil War the hall was a recruiting station.

Features Greek Revival-style architecture.

The museum has a library, exhibits and artifacts of the confederacy.

Donations Always Welcomed ~
Mail to: Confederate Museum
P.O. Box 20997
Charleston, SC 29413

Find out more…http://www.csa-scla.org/articles/ConfederateMuseum.htm

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The Edmondston-Alston House

The Edmondston Alston House

Picture source – http://www.edmondstonalston.com/

21 East Battery,
Charleston,
SC – 29401

843-722-7171

‘The Edmondston-Alston House is one of the few historic homes open to the public.

The house has a beautiful view of the harbor and of Fort Sumter.

Built in 1825 the house was commandeered by the Union Army during the Civil War.

After the war, the family appealed to President Andrew to get theri home back and he granted them a pardon for their role in the war.

The document is displayed in the front room.’

Adapted from article about Charleston by Judith Evans.

‘Of Charlestons many fine house museums, only the Edmondston-Alston House (constructed in 1825 and enhanced in 1838) commands a magnificent view of Charleston Harbor. From its piazza, General P. T. Beauregard watched the fierce bombardment of Ft. Sumter on April 12, 1861, signaling the start of the Civil War. And on December 11 of the same year, the house gave refuge to General Robert E. Lee the night a wide-spreading fire threatened his safety in a Charleston hotel.’

Learn about the Tours and Collections –http://www.edmondstonalston.com/

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The Old Citadel or the South Carolina State Arsenal – Charleston, S.C. (Embassy Suites)

The Old Citadel or the South Carolina State Arsenal - Charleston, S.C. (Embassy Suites)

Picture and text source – http://1.usa.gov/uSa0UW

337 Meeting Street
Charleston,
SC – 29403
 
843-723-6900
 
1.usa.gov/uSa0UW
Now a hotel, the building is open to the public.’

‘The S.C. State Arsenal, more commonly known as the Old Citadel, is associated with several aspects of Charlestons history.

The impetus for the Arsenals construction in the early 1830s was the 1822 slave revolt led by Denmark Vesey.

In 1842 the S.C. Military Academy, a liberal arts military college, was established by the state legislature.

The new Academy took over the arsenal the following year, and the school soon became know as The Citadel in reference to the fortress-like appearance of the building.

Many Citadel alumni fought in the Civil War.

Cadets remained at the school but were periodically ordered by the governor to support the Confederacy, and helped drill recruits, manufacture ammunition, protect arms depots, and guard Union prisoners.

Citadel cadets were responsible for firing the first shots of the Civil War, January 9, 1861, at the Union relief vessel approaching Fort Sumter.

From 1865 to 1881, during Reconstruction in Charleston, Federal troops occupied the Citadel and the school was closed.

Classes resumed at the Citadel in 1882, and continued here until the school was relocated to a campus on the banks of the Ashley River in 1922.’

For more information on the architecure, etc. visit the National Park Service Website.

Today the Old Citadel is home to Embassy Suites Hotel.

 
 
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