Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center

Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center

Photo and text source – http://bit.ly/33Llua

5200 Savannah Highway, 
Ravenel, SC 29470
 
Contact

(843) 889-8898 or

(843) 795-4386

Email

Hours

Wed-Sun: 9:00am-5:00pm

Mon and Tue: Closed

Admission

$1 or 1 Greenbax per person

Free: 2 years and under

Free: Gold Pass members

‘Journey from the past to the present and heritage to habitat at the Ravenel Caw Caw Interpretive Center. Rich in natural, cultural and historical resources, Caw Caw was once part of several rice plantations and home to enslaved Africans who applied their technology and skills in agriculture to carve the series of rice fields out of cypress swamps.

To help preserve and protect our natural resources and interpretive trails, dogs and bicycles are not permitted.’

Features

– Over 6 miles of trails with trailside exhibits

– Elevated boardwalks through wetlands (1,435 ft.)

– Environmental and social studies education programs from pre-school through college level

– Interpretive exhibits, displays, and programs

– Former 18th and 19th century rice fields and on one of the most important sites of the Stono Rebellion

– Thousands of naturalized tea plants from a 20th century tea farm

– Areas managed for wildlife including waterfowl, songbirds, otters, deer, and more

– Favored habitats for rare wildlife: American Alligators, Swallow-tailed Kites, Bald Eagles, and others

Group Rates

Environmental Educator or Interpreter-led educational group rates are available with reservations Monday through Sunday or self-led educational group rates available with reservations Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, call (843) 889-8898.

Nathaniel Russell House – Charleston, S.C.

A National Historic Landmark

Nathaniel Russell House - Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – Wikipedia

51 Meeting Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-724-8481
bit.ly/8I2d1U

‘Since 1808, visitors have admired the grand Federal townhouse of Charleston merchant Nathaniel Russell.

Set amid spacious formal gardens, the Nathaniel Russell House is a National Historic Landmark and is widely recognized as one of America’s most important neoclassical dwellings.

The graceful interior with elaborate plasterwork ornamentation, geometrically shaped rooms and a magnificent free-flying staircase are among the most exuberant ever created in early America.

Located in Downtown Charleston near High Battery, the house is furnished with period antiques and works of art that evoke the gracious lifestyle of the city’s merchant elite.

Today the Nathaniel Russell House interprets the lives of the Russell family, as well as the African American slaves and artisans who were responsible for maintaining one of the South’s grandest antebellum townhouses.’

Source – HistoricCharleston.org Nathaniel Russell House Website.

Old Slave MarOld Slave Mart Museum – Charleston, S.C.

Old Slave Mart Museum - Charleston, S.C.

Picture and Text Below Source – http://1.usa.gov/bYIbTy

6 Chalmers Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401

843-958-6467

‘The Old Slave Mart, located on one of Charleston’s few remaining cobblestone streets, is the only known extant building used as a slave auction gallery in South Carolina. Once part of a complex of buildings, the Slave Mart building is the only structure to remain.

When it was first constructed in 1859, the open ended building was referred to as a shed, and used the walls of the German Fire Hall to its west to support the roof timbers.

Slave auctions were held inside.

The interior was one large room with a 20-foot ceiling, while the front facade was more impressive with its high arch, octagonal pillars and a large iron gate.

During the antebellum period, Charleston served as a center of commercial activity for the South’s plantation economy, which depended heavily upon slaves as a source of labor. Customarily in Charleston, slaves were sold on the north side of theExchange Building (then the Custom House)…

Around 1878, the Slave Mart was renovated into a two-story tenement dwelling. In 1938, the property was purchased by Miriam B. Wilson, who turned the site into a museum of African American history, arts and crafts.’

It is owned by the City of Charleston.

Hours – Monday-Saturday, 9:00am to 5:00pm.

Call 843-958-6467 for information.

Admission fees are charged.

1.usa.gov/bYIbTy

Old City Market Hall and Sheds – Historic Charleston, S.C.

Old City Market Hall and Sheds - Historic Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – National Park Service

Corner of Market St. and Meeting St.,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-853-8000
www.thecharlestoncitymarket.com

‘Steeped in history and charm, the Charleston City Market is a popular destination for all who visit the Holy City.

Open 365 days per year, the Market is an exciting place for tourists and local Charleston residents alike.

Market Hall stands facing Meeting Street as the main entrance to four blocks of open-air buildings.

Strolling through the Market you will encounter a wide assortment of vendors selling high quality products including paintings, pottery, Charleston’s famous sweetgrass baskets, casual and fine dining & more!’

PDF Map of Historic Charleston Market

Visitor Info

Source – http://bit.ly/9Eunay

 

Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and sometimes later on weekend evenings.

 

Vendor contact information and more can be found on the City of Charleston Website
Source of text below – National Park Service

 

History of the Market –

‘The Market Hall and Sheds, a National Historic Landmark, are the only surviving market buildings in Charleston, and one of a small number of market complexes still extant in the United States.

The Market is also considered to be one of Charlestons best examples of Greek Revival style architecture, exemplified by its massive portico supported by Tuscan columns.

The buildings were constructed in 1840 to 41 and were designed by prominent local architect Edward Brickell White.

The Market was the commercial hub of Charleston for many years and is an important part of the city’s commercial heritage.’

 

Source – National Park Service

 

For more about the history of the market and the current occupancy visit the National Park Service Website ORWikipedia.

Drayton Hall – Southern Plantation in Charleston, S.C.

Drayton Hall - Southern plantation in Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – http://www.draytonhall.org

‘Drayton Hall is the closet plantation to Charleston. It is the only plantation home in Charleston not destroyed in the Civil War. The owners fled leaving the property to the slaves. The slaves saw smoke near Magnolia Plantation and put put yellow quarantine flags at the gate to make Union soldiers think there was malaria present.’  Adapted from article about Charleston by Judith Evans. 

‘Drayton Halls story spans three centuries of American History. It is the oldest surviving example of Georgian Palladian architecture in the U.S. and one of the only pre-Revolutionary houses that remain in close to original condition today.’ See DraytonHall.org for more. 

Open 7 days a week except major holidays.

Monday through Saturday: Main Gates: 9:00 a.m.-3:20 p.m. (Exit gate closes at 5 p.m.)

Museum Shop: 9:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.

First Tour: 9:30 a.m.

Last Tour: 3:30 p.m.

House Tours: Starting on the half hour at 9:30am. Please arrive at least 20 minutes before the start of the tour.

  • Connections:  From Africa to America: 10:45 a.m., 12:45 p.m., and 2:45 p.m.
  • Voices of Drayton Hall:  An Interactive Landscape Tour on DVD: Available for complimentary rental throughout the day; enjoy at your own pace.

Sundays: Main Gates: 11:00 a.m.-3:20 p.m. (Exit gate closes at 5 p.m.)

Museum Shop: 11:00 a.m.- 4:45 p.m.

First Tour: 11:30 a.m.

Last Tour: 3:30 p.m.

House Tours: Starting on the half hour at 11:30am. Please arrive at least 20 minutes before the start of the tour.

‘To help ensure a thoroughly enjoyable experience:

Visitors wishing to take a house tour should arrive at the front gate at least 20 minutes before the start of the tour to allow for ticket transaction, parking, and check-in.

If a house tour is sold out, you will be offered the next available tour of your choice.In addition to the house tour, there are other daily activities and programs available, and all are included in the price of regular adult admission-just click on Things To Do in the right hand column.

You can also save time by purchasing your tickets here. Please note that all visitors must first stop at the front gate before entering the site.’

CSS Hunley – Submarine – Warren Lasch Conservatory Center – Charleston, S.C

CSS Hunley - Submarine - Warren Lasch Conservatory Center - Charleston, S.C.

Picture source – Hunley.org

1250 Supply Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29405

843-743-4865

www.hunley.org

The CSS Hunley or L.L. Hunley is a previously sunken Confederate submarine which was finally found in 1995 off of Sullivans Island. It was found by the National Underwater Marine Agency team of best selling author Clive Cussler.

Stories on Hunley.org –

– The Historic Mission (and Sinking) 

– Finding the Hundley 

Wikipedia.com article on the L.L. Hunley 

‘Weekend Tours of the Hunley

Hunley tours are available every Saturday from 10 AM – 5 PM and Sunday Noon-5 PM. Last tour begins at 4:40 PM. Tours are not available on weekdays so scientists can continue their work preserving the Hunley for future generations. Tours are not available on Easter Sunday.

Tickets ordered in advance are $12.00 plus a service charge and can be purchased by either calling toll-free 1-877-448-6539 (1-877-4HUNLEY) or at www.etix.com (links to specific dates listed below). Children under 5 are free.

Walk-up tickets are also available on a first come, first serve basis. These tickets do not have a service charge. Tickets for Friends of the Hunley members, senior citizens, and military are discounted to $10.00. If you are eligible for this discount, please purchase your ticket at the door.

The Hunley is located at:

Warren Lasch Conservation Center

1250 Supply Street (on the old Charleston Navy Base), North Charleston, S.C.

Tour Inquiries

– For questions about Hunley tours, please call the Friends of the Hunley directly at 843.743.4865 ext. 10.

– If you have questions about pre-reserved tickets, please contact Etix.com at support@etix.com.

– Group tours (20+ guests) can be scheduled for weekdays with advance notice. For more information, contact Josephine Starnes at 843.743.4865 ext. 28 or email herjstarnes@hunley.org

The Charleston Museum – Americas First Museum

www.charlestonmuseum.org

360 Meeting Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29403
843-722-2996

Email – info@charlestonmuseum.org

‘America’s First Museum, founded in 1773.

Its mission is to preserve and interpret the cultural and natural history of Charleston and the South Carolina Lowcountry.

We invite you to explore this rich, varied history at the Museum and its two National Historic Landmark houses.

All are located downtown, in America’s Most Historic City.

Inspired in part by the creation of the British Museum (1759), the Museum was established in 1773 by the Charleston Library Society and is commonly regarded as America’s first museum. Its early history was characterized by association with distinguished South Carolinians and scientific figures including Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Reverend John Bachman and John J. Audubon. Many of the original collections were destroyed by fire in 1778 and operations were suspended during the American Revolution; however, collecting resumed in the 1790s.’

‘First opened to the public in 1824, the Museum developed prominent collections declared in 1852 by Harvard scientist Louis Aggasiz to be among the finest in America.

Operations were temporarily suspended due to the Civil War, but began again shortly after the conflict.

Progressively acquired from the late 18th century to the present, the Museum’s collections now present the oldest-acquired and the most comprehensive assemblage of South Carolina materials in the nation.

Modern collecting emphases include natural science, ornithology, historical material culture and both documentary and photographic resources.’

Hours of Operation

Museum – Monday-Saturday 9-5, Sunday 1-5

Historic Houses – Monday-Saturday 10-5, Sunday 1-5

Admission

Museum – $10/adults, $5/children 4-12, children 3 and under free

Historic Houses – $10 adults, $5/children 4-12, children 3 and under free

Group rates and discounted multi-site tickets available

Information and Prices subject to change

Calhoun Mansion – Charleston, S.C.

Calhoun Mansion, Charleston, S.C.

Picture Source – CalhounMansion.net 

The Largest Privately Owned Home in Charleston.

16 Meeting Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
843-722-8205

‘Nothing else on the Charleston Peninsula compares to the Calhoun Mansion.

Boasting a striking italianate design, the Calhoun Mansion, the largest residence in Charleston, has 35 rooms, a grand ballroom, japanese water gardens, 35 fireplaces, 75 foot high domed stairhall ceiling, khoi ponds, private elevator, three levels of piazzas, ornate chandeliers, a 90 foot cupola, and many more wonderful surprises that make up the house’s more than 24,000 square feet.’

‘Italianate manor house built in 1876 currently used as a private home and a museum; includes photos, tour schedule, and history of the property.’

Source – CalhounMansion.net