Charleston Restaurant Week, Sept. 5-16, 2012

The popular ‘Charleston Restaurant Week’ will be offered again thanks to the planning and promotion of the Charleston Restaurant Association (CRA).

This is a wonderful opportunity to taste the world class cuisine of Charleston and the Lowcountry!

Participating restaurants will be offering menus with three items for one price ($20, $30, or $40).

Hotels have special deals, too!

Check out the list of participating restaurants at www.CharlestonRestaurantAssociation.com

Here is an informative blog entry regarding ‘Charleston Restaurant Week’ from Tuesday, August 21st – http://www.charlestonrestaurantassociation.com/news/charleston-restaurant-week-is-september-5-16-participating-restaurants-and-menus-are-being-released-now/

Charleston Comedy Festival – Charleston, S.C.

843-810-6288

www.charlestoncomedyfestival.com/

Presented by Theatre 99 and Charleston City Paper

‘Some of the country’s hottest improv, sketch, and stand-up artists will descend upon Charleston, S.C., for what has become the annual event you don’t want to miss!

Past performers include Aziz Ansari, Bobby Moynihan and the UCB Buffoons, Cook County Social Club, Elephant Larry, The Uprights Citizen Brigade Touring Company, Kenny Zimlinghaus, Myq Kaplan, The Beards of Comedy, Craig Baldo, Eliza Skinner, God’s Pottery, Hot Sauce, Harvard Sailing Team, and many many more.’

Source: http://bit.ly/16cyEQ

Venues:

Theatre 99

The American Theatre

Stars at the American Theater

Charleston Pour House

Threshold Repertory Theatre

Footlight Players Theatre

Pure Theatre

Boone Hall Plantation & Gardens, Mt. Pleasant, S.C.

http://boonehallplantation.com/

1235 Long Point Rd.
Mt. Pleasant, S.C. 29464
(8 miles from downtown Charleston, S.C.)
Phone (843) 884-4371

Boone Hall and Plantation, Mount Pleasant, S.C.

Mont Royal the main house at Boone Hall

Picture Source – Wikipedia

‘The Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens is an antebellum plantation located in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The plantation includes a large Colonial Revival plantation house (1933-35) that replaces the lost original house on the site, a number of slave cabins (which were occupied bysharecroppers well into the 20th century), several flower gardens, and the historic “Avenue of Oaks”: a nearly one mile drive up to the house with live oaks on either side, originally planted in 1743. Boone Hall plantation sits on Wampacheeoone Creek in Christ Church Parish about 10 miles (16 km) from historic downtown Charleston.’

Source – Wikipedia

Slave Cabins at Boone Hall Plantation

Slave Cabins at Boone Hall Plantation

Picture Source – Wikipedia

Avenue of Oaks, Boone Hall and Plantation

Avenue of Oaks at Boone Plantation

Picture Source – Wikipedia

 

Get Directions

Circular Congregation Church – Charleston, S.C.

Circular Congregation Church - Charleston, S.C.

Picture source – http://www.circularchurch.org

150 Meeting Street
Charleston, SC
29401
 
843-577-6400
www.circularchurch.org/
‘…one of the oldest continuously worshipping congregations in the South. Among highlights of our history are:- Charles Towne’s original settlers founded this protestant, or dissenting, church about 1681.-The graveyard is the city’s oldest burial grounds with monuments dating from 1695.- The first meeting house on this site gave Meeting Street its name.- The third structure here, a vast, circular hall built in 1804, burned in 1861.- Bricks from “Old Circular” were used in building the present sanctuary, completed in 1892.- Historically Independent: the congregation is now related to the United Church of Christ and thePresbyterian Church (U.S.A.).- Circular Church remains a vibrant, diverse community. Visitors are welcome both to explore the grounds and to explore the faith in worship, ministry, and life in community.’Source – http://bit.ly/skpsh8
Get Directions

The Old Citadel or the South Carolina State Arsenal – Charleston, S.C. (Embassy Suites)

The Old Citadel or the South Carolina State Arsenal - Charleston, S.C. (Embassy Suites)

Picture and text source – http://1.usa.gov/uSa0UW

337 Meeting Street
Charleston,
SC – 29403
 
843-723-6900
 
1.usa.gov/uSa0UW
Now a hotel, the building is open to the public.’

‘The S.C. State Arsenal, more commonly known as the Old Citadel, is associated with several aspects of Charlestons history.

The impetus for the Arsenals construction in the early 1830s was the 1822 slave revolt led by Denmark Vesey.

In 1842 the S.C. Military Academy, a liberal arts military college, was established by the state legislature.

The new Academy took over the arsenal the following year, and the school soon became know as The Citadel in reference to the fortress-like appearance of the building.

Many Citadel alumni fought in the Civil War.

Cadets remained at the school but were periodically ordered by the governor to support the Confederacy, and helped drill recruits, manufacture ammunition, protect arms depots, and guard Union prisoners.

Citadel cadets were responsible for firing the first shots of the Civil War, January 9, 1861, at the Union relief vessel approaching Fort Sumter.

From 1865 to 1881, during Reconstruction in Charleston, Federal troops occupied the Citadel and the school was closed.

Classes resumed at the Citadel in 1882, and continued here until the school was relocated to a campus on the banks of the Ashley River in 1922.’

For more information on the architecure, etc. visit the National Park Service Website.

Today the Old Citadel is home to Embassy Suites Hotel.

 
 
Get Directions

St. Michaels Church – Charleston S.C.

St. Michaels Church - Charleston S.C.

Picture Source – Wikipedia

71 Broad Street,
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-723-0603
 
‘St. Michael’s Episcopal Church is an historic Episcopal church and the oldest surviving religious structure in CharlestonSouth Carolina.
It is located at Broad and Meeting streets on one of the Four Corners of the Law, and represents ecclesiastical law.
It was built in the 1750s by order of the South Carolina Assembly.
It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is aNational Historic Landmark.
It is still an active church in the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.
 
‘Source – Wikipedia
Virtual Tour – may not work on mobile phones

Get Directions

First Scots Presbyterian Church, Charleston, S.C.

 

First Scots Presbyterian Church

Source – National Park Service

53 Meeting Street
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-722-8882
‘First Scots Presbyterian Church, the fifth oldest church in Charleston, was constructed in 1814. Its design was perhaps inspired by St. Mary’s Cathedral in Baltimore, Maryland designed by Benjamin Latrobe. Latrobe was the first professionally trained American architect, best known for designing the United States Capitol. The massive brick Presbyterian Church has walls that are three feet thick and covered with stucco. Twin towers rise above a columned portico. Reflecting the heritage of the congregation, the seal of the Church of Scotland is displayed in the stained glass window over the main entrance, and the decorative wrought iron grilles contain thistles, the symbol of Scotland. First Scots replaced the congregation’s first church, a frame building previously located in the southeast corner of the graveyard. The graveyard contains more than 50 stones that date earlier than 1800.’

Source – National Park Service

To learn more about the history of the building, the meetings of the church body and natural disaster tragedies visit the National Park Service Website.

‘The church is open to the public 8:30am to 5:00pm Monday- Friday.

Call 843-722-8882 for further information.’

Get Directions

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church

Source – National Park Service

Open to the public Mon.-Fri. 9:00am to 1:00pm and 2:00pm to 4:00pm.

110 Calhoun Street
Charleston,
SC – 29401
 
843-722-2561

‘The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church is a Gothic Revival style church built in 1891.

Retaining its original alter, communion rail, pews, and light fixtures the church is one of only a few unaltered religious interiors in Charleston, especially from the Victorian period.

The brick Gothic church with its tall steeple replaced an earlier 1872 church badly damaged by the 1886 earthquake.

Today Emanuel is the oldest AME church in the South, and houses the oldest black congregation south of Baltimore, Maryland.

The history of this congregation reflects the development of religious institutions for African Americans in Charleston.

Its roots stem from a religious group of free blacks and slaves organized in 1791.

In 1816, black members of Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal church withdrew over disputed burial ground, and under the leadership of Morris Brown, formed a separate congregation. The church’s 1400 members soon thereafter established themselves an African Methodist Episcopal church, a denomination formally established in 1816 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Two years later, Brown and other ministers of the church were jailed for violating state and local laws which prohibited religious gatherings of slaves and free blacks independent of white supervision.’

Source – National Park Service

To learn more about a planned slave revolt and the burning of the church during the crisis and more see the National Park Service Website.

Get Directions